Regina Jeffer’s “Darcy’s Passions.”

Jane Austen, Watercolour and pencil portrait b...

Jane Austen, Watercolour and pencil portrait by her sister Cassandra, 1810 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

I had read this book a while back, but decided to give it one more shot. Here’s the deal: Regina Jeffers is obviously a much better writer than most others in this particular genre. At the very least, she has a firm grasp on sentence structure. The reason I’m not changing my rating from a two star is because ultimately, the book lacks in originality.

 

In her preface, she talks about how she didn’t want to quote Jane Austen and has instead, chosen to paraphrase. This in itself is annoying because there are so many famous quotes that she basically mutilates. It’s distracting, and honestly, not very successful. The other issue is that in her re-telling, she does just that: re-tell. I don’t want to read a (very) slightly modified version of P&P, I want something original. There’s a reason why Austen made Darcy’s character so vague in P&P, and I would’ve loved to see someone who clearly adores the book attempt to look at the story from Darcy’s perspective. But it almost feels as if Jeffers is too hesitant to venture too far from the original story. That leaves us with a watered-down rehashing of the scenes with just a tiny bit of insight into Darcy’s psyche. I wish Jeffers would have ventured out and really delved into a character study. She’s clearly capable of it.

 

On the positive side, the few original scenes in the book show a lot of promise. I especially like her characterization of Georgiana. She’s not portrayed as a child, and actually shows a lot of promise. Her relationship with Darcy is exactly what we would expect: one of great affection and support. I truly wish that Jeffers had concentrated more on creating new nuances to the story rather than what we are presented with here. The few chapters at the very end of the book (after Lizzy & Darcy marry) are infinitely more interesting than the rest.

 



Categories: Book Reviews

Tags: , , , , ,

Comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: